Tuesday, November 19, 2019

6 things to know when shopping for High Bay Lighting

Consider LED High Bay Lighting for your project

Whether you are constructing a new facility that needs high bay lighting or looking to upgrade your current high bay lighting fixtures, there are a few things you should know before you make your final decision about the solution that’s best for you:
  1. Lighting Technology: Conventional incandescent lamps put out 10 – 20 lumens per watt of electricity. High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps and fluorescents put out 50 – 75 lumens per watt.  LED high bay lights are constantly improving, with lumens per watt approaching upwards of 160.  So the best long run decision is to go with the high efficiency LED high bay lights.  The energy savings alone will more than offset the higher cost per fixture. Another benefit of the LEDs is that they are dimmable, so depending on your specific needs means that you can gain even more savings by dimming the lights or turning them on/off with the use of occupancy sensors.
  2. Light Level: Depending how the facility is being used will help determine the desired light level you’ll need.  In a production facility where precision work is performed will need much higher light levels than a warehouse used for storage.  PKK Lighting can help guide you with the selection of the proper light levels based on how the space will be used. 
  3. Dimensions of area: Knowing the length, width and height of the area to be lit will be critical as it will help determine the number and spacing of the LED high bay light fixtures. Ideally, a blue print of the facility will allow your lighting professional to properly design the solution.
  4. Ceiling Type: The ceiling type will help determine how and where to mount the high bay fixtures. Some common types of ceilings include drywall, metal trusses, purlins, and corrugated metal.
  5. Available Voltage: Before making a buying decision for your LED high bay lights, you need to know what voltage will be available to power the fixtures.  High bay light fixtures are specifically designed for a certain level of power and will underperform (or not work at all) if that level of power is not provided. 
  6. Budget: How much budget is set aside for your lighting system? 
PKK Lighting has been designing, installing and maintaining lighting systems for our customers for almost 50 years.  We can consult with you on your LED High Bay lighting project and make recommendations on the best solution taking all of the above into consideration. 

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Deciding between LED Tubes and LED Lighting Fixtures

If your organization is looking to get the benefits of upgrading your older linear fluorescent lights with LED, one of the decisions you’ll need to make is whether you will replace the fluorescent tubes with LED tubes or invest in new LED fixtures.
The decision is similar to whether you should continue to invest in your older model car and keep it running for just a bit longer or is it time to invest in a newer model.
There are several pros and cons to LED tubes and LED Fixtures, and we’ll explore those in more detail in a future blog post.  This post will focus on some of the things you should consider as you make your initial decision to use LED tubes or new LED fixtures.
  1. What is the condition of your existing lighting fixtures?  Are they yellowed or have cracked lenses?  How easy or difficult is it to find replacement lenses or parts to keep them running?
  2. Is the energy efficiency of the lighting and ease of future maintenance an important consideration?  There’s no doubt that LED fixtures will provide you with better energy efficiency and lower cost maintenance, so if that’s important to you then LED fixtures might be the way to go.  Having said that, there are some very good low-cost LED tubes that can save you money up front.
  3. Do you plan to do a complete lighting retrofit (replacing all fluorescents with LED), or are you replacing fluorescents with LED’s as they burn out?  If you plan to replace as they burn out and avoid the upfront cost of a complete retrofit, then LED tubes are probably the right choice for you.
  4. Do you need to meet building codes or energy control standards?  If you have strict efficiency or energy control requirements, the likely best solution is a complete fixture replacement with LED.  The newest LED technology can incorporate advance controls that will meet, and even exceed, building codes and energy control requirements.
  5. Are there any rebates available for LED tubes or fixtures?  Wisconsin Focus on Energy partners with electric utilities to provide rebates to residential and business customers who invest in energy saving projects.  Your rebate may be the deciding factor of whether you decide to use LED tubes or new LED fixtures.  Let PKK Lighting walk you through the Lighting Incentive Catalog Supplemental Data Sheet to determine your potential rebate.
If you need help evaluating your situation, contact the lighting experts at PKK Lighting.  We’ve been assisting businesses like yours with lighting installation and lighting maintenance services since 1970.
This post was originally published at https://www.pkklighting.com/deciding-between-led-tubes-and-led-lighting-fixtures/

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

How to calculate ROI and payback period from LED lighting retrofit project

This is the sixth and final blog post in the series to calculate the total Return on Investment (ROI) that a business will generate from their LED lighting retrofit project. Previously, we published the following posts in this series:
  1. How to calculate Material savings from an LED lighting retrofit project – June 2019
  2. How to calculate the HVAC energy savings from an LED lighting retrofit project – April 2019
  3. Energy Savings from an LED Lighting Retrofit projectMarch 2019
  4. Labor Savings from an LED Lighting Retrofit projectFebruary 2019
  5. What will you save from an LED Lighting Retrofit Project?January 2019
The previous five posts provide all of the calculations for the various aspects of your retrofit project so you can determine how much potential savings your organization will realize from your project.  But what does it all mean and will your business be better off?  This post will help tie all of the information together so you can actually see what this means for your business, how long it will take for the project to pay for itself, and your Return on Investment (ROI).
Payback Period and ROI
The Payback Period is the amount of time it will take you to recoup your original investment in the project.  The ROI is a ratio of the total savings from the project to the total project cost and it will demonstrate how profitable the project is.
For this post we will continue our example from the previous posts in the series where we are replacing a 90 watt PAR 38 bulb with a 14 watt LED PAR 38 and is operated for 12 hours per day for 250 days per year.
Step 1 – Determine Total Project Cost
Be sure to include all of the costs associated with the retrofit project, including the cost of new materials, installation costs, and any additional costs for disposal/recycling the old bulbs.  For our example we are using an all-in cost of $40 per bulb, which includes the cost of the replacement LED bulb, installation, and disposal of the old bulb.  For a project with a total of 100 old bulbs being replaced with LEDs, the total project cost would be $4,000 ($40 x 100).
Step 2 – Calculate Annual Savings
Using the calculations from the previous blog posts in the series, here is a recap of the savings:
  • Energy Savings: $27.36 per light per year (See original post)
  • + HVAC Savings: $3.45 per light per year (See original post)
  • + Labor Savings: $25.86 per light per year (See original post) – note that in the original post we used 4,380 total operating hours. Adjusting that computation to be the same as the other savings calculations (250 days per year for 12 hours per day = 3,000 operating hours per year) results in labor savings of $25.86 per light per year.
  • + Material Savings: $13.89 per light per year (See original post)
  • = Total Savings Per Light Per Year: $70.56
For a retrofit project with a total of 100 lights, that amounts to Total Savings of $7,056 annually ($70.56 x 100).
Step 3 – Calculate Payback Period
  • Total Project Cost: $4,000
  • Divided by Total Annual Savings: $7,056
  • Equals: Payback Period in Years: .57 years
That means that the project will pay for itself in just over 6 months!  What are you waiting for?
Step 4 – Calculate Return on Investment (ROI)
The final step in the process of determining the inherent value in the project is to calculate the ROI.  This might be a useful measure for the decision-makers that have multiple projects competing for limited funds.
Total Annual Savings: $7,056
Minus: Total Project Cost: $4,000
Equals – Net Savings: $3,056
Divided by – Total Project Cost: $4,000
Equals – ROI: .764; expressed as a percentage: 76.4%
Think if your retirement plan could generate a return of 76.4% year after year!  In this example it makes sense to invest in the project and start generating the positive returns. 
If your organization is considering an LED retrofit project, contact PKK Lighting in Madison, Wisconsin and our lighting consultants will be happy to walk you through the evaluation of your lighting project.
This post was originally published at https://www.pkklighting.com/how-to-calculate-roi-and-payback-period-from-led-lighting-retrofit-project/

Friday, June 21, 2019

How to calculate Material savings from an LED lighting retrofit project

This is the fifth blog post in the series to calculate the total Return on Investment (ROI) that a business will generate from their LED lighting retrofit project. Previously, we published the following posts in this series:
  1. How to calculate Material savings from an LED lighting retrofit project – April 2019
  2. Energy Savings from an LED Lighting Retrofit projectMarch 2019
  3. Labor Savings from an LED Lighting Retrofit projectFebruary 2019
  4. What will you save from an LED Lighting Retrofit Project?January 2019
This post focuses on the Material savings gained by a lighting retrofit project and the long-life LED products incorporated into the project. Most of the products you’ll be replacing during the project, like incandescent, CFL or halogen bulbs, have life-spans of 1,500 to 15,000 hours.  That means that if you operate your lights 12 hours a day for 250 days a year (3,000 hours), you’ll be replacing burned out bulbs up to 2 times per year.  Those costs can add up quickly, especially if you have hundreds, or even thousands of fixtures in your facilities.
LED lights, on the other hand, have life spans of 35,000 to 100,000 hours. At 3,000 hours per year, that’s 11 – 33 years!  An even then the bulb may not burn out but may just lose some of its’ output capacity, so your life spans could exceed the standard rated hours.
We will continue our example from the series in that we are replacing 90 watt PAR 38 bulbs with 14 watt LED PAR 38 bulbs that operate 3,000 hours per year. 
Step 1: Gather Data – the following information will be needed to start the calculations:
  • Rated life for the current lights: for this calculation we will make an assumption that you are using a PAR 38 with a rated life of 1,500 hours.
  • Rated life for the new lights: for this calculation we will make an assumption that the replacement lights are LED PAR 38 with a rated life of 50,000 hours and come with a 5-year warranty.
  • Replacement cost for the current lights: for this calculation we will make an assumption that the replacement cost for a 90W Halogen PAR 38 is $7.50.
  • Replacement cost for the new lights: for this calculation we will make an assumption that the replacement cost for a 14W LED PAR 38 is $18.50.
  • Total Annual Running time: in this example the annual run time is 3,000 hours.
Step 2: Calculate the number of times you will need to replace the current lights per year, which is dependent on the rated life and run time per year:
  • Total Run Time per year: 3,000 hours
  • Divided by: Rated life of current lights: 1,500 hours
  • Equals: Number of times per year you’ll replace each light: 2 replacements per year
Step 3: Cost of replacing existing lights:
  • Annual replacements from above: 2 per year
  • Times: Cost to replace from above: $7.50
  • Equals: Annual replacement costs per year: $15.00
Step 4: Calculate the number of times you will need to replace the new LED lights per year, which is dependent on the rated life and run time per year:
  • Total Run Time per year: 3,000 hours
  • Divided by: Rated life of current lights: 50,000 hours
  • Equals: Number of times per year you’ll replace each light: .06 replacements per year
Step 5: Cost of replacing new LED lights:
  • Annual replacements from above: .06 per year
  • Times: Cost to replace from above: $18.50
  • Equals: Annual replacement costs per year: $1.11
Step 6: Calculate your savings per year:
  • Annual replacements per year for current lights: $15.00 per year
  • Minus: Annual replacements per year for new LED lights: $1.11 per year
  • Equals: Annual material savings per light: $13.89
(Note that this calculation does not take into effect the normal 5 year warranty provided by the LED light manufacturer, so during years 1-5 of the project your replacement cost for the LED lights would be zero and you’d have an even larger annual material savings per year.)
Using the annual material cost savings per light ($13.89 in this example) you can determine the total material savings based upon the number of lights you’ll be replacing during your LED lighting retrofit project.  Multiplied over hundreds or thousands of replacements and the savings add up quickly.
The professional lighting installation experts at PKK Lighting would be delighted to talk to you about your LED retrofit project.  We can help you evaluate the opportunity, manage the entire project, and provide ongoing lighting maintenance of your system.
This post was originally published at https://www.pkklighting.com/how-to-calculate-material-savings-from-an-led-lighting-retrofit-project/

Tuesday, May 7, 2019

How to calculate HVAC energy savings from an LED lighting retrofit project

An LED Lighting Retrofit project will provide a significant ROI to your company

This is the fourth blog post in the series to calculate the total Return on Investment (ROI) that a business will generate from an LED lighting retrofit project. Previously, we published the following posts in this series:
  1. Energy Savings from an LED Lighting Retrofit projectMarch 2019
  2. Labor Savings from an LED Lighting Retrofit projectFebruary 2019
  3. What will you save from an LED Lighting Retrofit Project?January 2019
This post will address how a lighting retrofit project will save you money on your HVAC costs.  The primary assumption behind this part of the overall savings is that the retrofit project is being done in an area that is air conditioned.
So, how would a retrofit project help generate HVAC savings?  Incandescent and halogen bulbs from older light fixtures do two things really well, produce light (which is what they are supposed to do) and produce a LOT of heat.  Dealing with that extra heat in the summer months is what takes extra energy.  The American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) has established a rule of thumb that it takes 30-35 watts of cooling to offset the heat generated for each 100 watts of lights within a space.  We will use 32.5 watts for our computation below.
We will continue our example from the last post in that we are replacing 90 watt PAR 38 bulbs with 14 watt LED PAR 38 bulbs that operate 3,000 hours per year. 
These step-by-step instructions will help your business calculate the potential HVAC savings so you can evaluate if it makes sense to include these savings in your overall ROI computation.
Step 1: Gather Data – the following information will be needed to start the calculations:
  • Total energy savings per year per light: this is one of the outputs from the March 2019 post - 228 kwh saved per year per light.
  • Percent of the year that a business operates its air conditioning.  According to a 35 year old study by the U.S. Department of the Navy, Naval Civil Engineering Lab, CR82.028, 1982, Madison Wisconsin air conditioners were operational 38.85% of the year.  Granted, this data is old, and given the warmer temperatures over the last few decades, it’s likely that the percentage would be higher, but 38.85% will work for this calculation.
  • Electricity Rate: $0.12/kwh is the average rate in Dane county.
Step 2: Energy savings from reduced HVAC:
  • KWH saved per light replaced with an efficient LED: 228 kwh
  • Times: % of the year that air conditioner is running: 38.85%
  • Times: Cooling required per ASHRAE rule: 32.5 watts
  • Equals: 28.79 kwh of HVAC savings per year per light
Step 3: Cost savings from reduced HVAC demand:
  • HVAC savings from above: 28.79 kwh
  • Times: Electricity Rate: $0.12/hwh
  • Equals: Savings per light: $3.45/light per year
While a savings of $3.45 per light per year may not seem like much, if you have hundreds, or even thousands of light fixtures that you are replacing during an LED lighting retrofit project, the savings will add up quickly.
If you are considering an LED retrofit project and want to consult with a professional lighting installation company, contact PKK Lighting.  We can help you evaluate the opportunity, manage the project, and maintain the lighting system well into the future.
This post was originally published at https://www.pkklighting.com/how-to-calculate-hvac-energy-savings-from-an-led-lighting-retrofit-project/.

Friday, March 29, 2019

Energy Savings from an LED Lighting Retrofit project

How to calculate the energy savings from an LED retrofit project

Of all of the reasons to embark on an LED lighting retrofit project, the energy savings from the project might be the most compelling.  Not only do the savings go directly into your pocket from a reduction in your monthly utility bills, but the carbon footprint your business is leaving is smaller.  While the impact of the project on our planet is important, it’s the reduction in your utility costs that will likely get management’s attention and help sell the project.
This is the third blog post in the series to calculate the savings from an LED lighting retrofit project.  In the previous 2 posts we introduced the topic (What will you save from an LED Lighting Retrofit Project?,) and dove into the Labor savings in more detail (Labor Savings from an LED Lighting Retrofit project).  In this post we will provide more details about how to calculate the Energy savings from a retrofit project.
Unlike the calculation of the Labor savings we introduced with our last post, which involves several assumptions for how long the bulbs will last, how many minutes does it take to change a bulb, and the fully loaded labor rate, the calculation of the energy savings is a very straight forward math problem.  Put simply, the total energy savings is the money your company will save due to the reduction in wattage from switching from less efficient lights to the more efficient LED lighting products. 
For the purposes of calculating the energy savings, our project assumes we are replacing a series of older 90 watt PAR 38 lights with 14 watt LED PAR 38 lights.
Steps to calculate the Energy Savings from your project:
Step 1 – Gather the inputs for our project
  • Wattage of old lights: 90 watts
  • Wattage of new LED lights: 14 watts
  • Operating hours: for this calculation we’ll assume the lights are on for 12 hours a day for 250 business days per year
  • Electric rate: this is the rate you pay your electric company. In Dane County, Wisconsin, the average rate for electricity is $0.12 per kilowatt hour.  For your calculation you’ll need to check with your electric company.
Step 2 – Calculate the Energy Savings for each bulb
Using the inputs from Step 1, the savings per bulb is calculated as follows:
  • Wattage of old light: 90 watts
  • Minus: wattage of new light: 14 watts
  • Equals: Savings per light: 76 watts
Step 3 – Calculate the total Operating hours
  • Operating hours per day: 12 hours
  • Times: operating days per year: 250
  • Equals: 3,000 operating hours per year for each light
Step 4 – Calculate the Energy Savings per light in kilowatt hours (kwh)
  • 76 watts saved per light
  • Times: 3,000 operating hours per year
  • Divided by: 1,000 (to convert to kwh)
  • Equals: 228 kwh saved per year
Step 5 – Calculate the annual savings
  • Energy savings per light: 228 kwh
  • Times: Electricity rate: $0.12/kwh
  • Equals: $27.36 Savings per light per year
Now that you know the savings from each light, you can easily determine the savings from your LED lighting retrofit project(s).  For example, if you have a warehouse with 100 lights, your retrofit project would save $2,736 in electricity costs per year – a substantial savings!
If you would like some guidance on your LED lighting retrofit project or need an experienced lighting installation company to help with your project, contact PKK Lighting in Madison, WI.  We’ve helped hundreds of customers take advantage of the savings from more efficient lighting solutions and we’d like to help you.

Thursday, February 21, 2019

How to calculate the labor savings from your LED retrofit project

In our last post, What will you save from an LED Lighting Retrofit Project?, we provided a high level overview of how to calculate the savings your business will recognize from an LED lighting retrofit project.  As a reminder, the major contributors to the total savings are:
  1. Labor savings
  2. Energy savings
  3. Material savings
  4. HVAC savings
In this post we will go into more detail about the labor savings from an LED lighting retrofit project.
Your older lighting products, like incandescent, halogen, or CFL bulbs, have lifespans of 1,500 to 15,000 hours.  Depending on your business and your lighting needs, these bulbs could be operating 365 days a year and an average of 12 or more hours per day.  At the low end of the lifespan, that means that you need to replace each bulb about 3 times per year.  In order to replace the burnt-out bulbs you have to spend time purchasing/tracking your inventory of replacement bulbs, using your own employee or hiring a contractor to find the correct replacement bulb and then replacing the bulb (which could involve a ladder or lift to reach the fixture). 
If your facility has hundreds of lighting fixtures, you can see how the time and cost to replace bulbs can add up quickly.
Switching to LED lighting, with a rated life of 35,000 to 100,000 hours, would significantly lower your labor costs because you don’t have to change bulbs as often.  Also, many LEDs come with a manufacturer’s warranty, which will further defray your total maintenance costs.
Let’s work a “real” example:
  • In our example we are determining the labor savings from replacing 90 watt PAR 38 bulbs with 14 watt PAR 38 bulbs.  These bulbs are operating 365 days a year for an average of 12 hours per day (4,380 hours/year).  For purposes of this calculation, we will assume that the rated life for the existing 90 watt bulbs is 1,500 hours and the rated life of the replacement LEDs is 50,000 hours.
  • Determine the number of annual replacements for the old bulbs.  With a 1,500 hour rated life operating for 4,380 hours per year, each of the old bulbs will need to be replaced 2.92 times. 
  • Determine the number of annual replacements for the new LED bulbs.  With a 50,000 hour rated life operating for 4,380 hours per year, each of the LED bulbs will need to be replaced .09 times per year. 
  • Determine average time to change a bulb. For purposes of this calculation, we will assume it takes an average of 10 minutes to identify the proper bulb, find a replacement in the storage room, get a ladder (if needed), change out the bulb, and properly dispose of the burnt-out bulb.
  • Hourly rate for lighting maintenance.  This hourly rate will depend on whether you use a contractor or hire your own maintenance employee.  For purposes of this calculation, let’s assume a fully loaded labor rate of $80/hour.
  • Determine cost to change one bulb:
    • Minutes to change a bulb: 10
    • Cost per hour: $80
    • Labor cost to change a bulb: $13.33
  • Determine annual cost to maintain the old bulbs vs the new LEDs:
    • Old bulbs: replaced 2.92 times at $13.33 labor cost per replacement = $38.93 per year per fixture
    • New LEDs: replaced .09 times at $13.33 labor cost per replacement = $1.20 per year per fixture
  • Calculate the savings per year per fixture:
    • $38.93 labor cost per year for each fixture using the old bulbs vs $1.20 per fixture for the LEDs generates a savings of $37.73 per fixture per year.
If your facility has hundreds of fixtures, you can see how the labor savings adds up quickly and helps make the case for changing out your old, inefficient bulbs for LEDs that will provide you with years of worry free (and maintenance free) operation.
In future posts we will cover the Energy savings, Material savings, and HVAC savings from an LED lighting retrofit project.  Contact the LED lighting installation experts at PKK Lighting to discuss your next lighting project.

6 things to know when shopping for High Bay Lighting

Consider LED High Bay Lighting for your project Whether you are constructing a new facility that needs high bay lighting or looking to u...